Basketball drills for all skills

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  • As an exercise throw and catch, but the ball is played at knee height.
  • Pay particular attention to the pins, which are a little closer together and point to the ground.

  • As exercise throw and catch, but pass the ball a little higher, not so high that you have to jump, so just above the head.
  • Pay special attention to the catching and the position of the thumbs, a little closer together than in exercise 1.
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  • Players throw the ball to each other with two hands and catch with two hands.
  • Position at chest height.
  • Pay attention to either throwing or catching, not both at the same time.
  • The ball is held at the side with relaxed and spread fingers.
  • the palms of the hands must not touch the ball.
  • The thumbs are behind the ball;
  • the thumbs are behind the ball, and imaginary lines are drawn along the length of the thumbs,
  • Then they must cross in the 'heart' of the ball. .
  • the elbows are bent beside the body; the points are pointing to the ground.
  • the ball is held in front of the diaphragm.
  • in the face of an aggressive defender, the ball is brought up over the head or towards the hip;
  • in the latter case, one foot is placed in the direction of the opponent;
  • the elbows are slightly spread.


  • ...prepare for the ball to come.
  • Eyes on the approaching ball.
  • The arms are stretched out towards the ball;
  • the wrists are slightly bent backwards;
  • the fingers are spread and point upwards;
  • The body reaches slightly forward.
  • At the moment of ball contact, the fingertips touch the ball first;
  • the thumbs and slightly the index fingers are behind the ball,
  • so that the ball cannot shoot through.
  • the speed of the ball is slowed down by bending the arms.
  • The ball comes to rest in front of the diaphragm.
  • Especially with 'hard' passes, it is useful to place one foot in front of the other while catching.
  • The feet are in a small scissor or parallel position.
  • Knees slightly bent; torso slightly forward.
  • bodyweight above both feet.
  • the ball is held at chest level with the fingertips; thumbs behind the ball.
  • the elbows point backwards and are not too close to the body. eyes directed at the goal.
  • By extending the arms and the back leg, the ball is pushed away and guided for as long as possible; the ball leaves the hands via the fingertips.
  • At the end of the action, the palms point outwards and the thumbs downwards;
  • this is caused by the forceful folding of the wrists.
  • The body weight is transferred to the front foot through the entire action.
  • The pass is often supported by a step with the front leg in the direction of the goal.
  • The chest pass can also be performed in a sideways direction; pivoting in the direction of the goal is necessary for this.
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  • Halfway through the normal dribbling height, the ball is brought to the other dribbling hand with a wrist strike via a flat bounce.
  • At the moment the movement is started, the right leg steps forward,
  • so that the ball can reach the left hand unimpeded.
  • The ball passes in front of the left foot.
  • The ball is taken low with the other hand.
  • After the takeover the body turns over the left foot between the ball and the defender,
  • where the free (bent) arm again has a protective function.


  • In the speed dribble, the upper body makes an angle of less than 90 degrees with the ground.
  • This is highly dependent on the speed at which the dribble is performed. The higher the speed, the smaller the angle.
  • The dribbling arm is directed more forward due to the speed.
  • The dribble is between hip and chest height; the ball is pushed powerfully to the ground and lands next to the shoulder axis in front of the feet.
  • If there are no defenders around, the free arm has a balancing function
  • If this is not the case, the dribbler will initially try to increase his speed in order to shake off the defender
  • If this does not work, he can use his free arm to prevent the opponent from taking the ball.
  • Obviously, this will be at the expense of speed.
  • The walking speed must be in accordance with the dribbler's level; walking and dribbling must not hinder each other.
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  • The knees and ankles are bent strongly during the low dribble, allowing the ball to stay extra low to the ground.
  • The torso and head, on the other hand, remain practically straight.
  • The gaze is directed towards the opponent(s) and the rest of the field of play
  • The free (slightly bent) arm is turned towards the opponent and has a protective function.
  • If the situation requires, the body is brought between the opponent and the ball.



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